What Tony Robbins Taught Me About Guitar

I’m gonna share something I learned from Tony Robbins that made me a better guitar player.

But here’s the thing…

It’s not a “technique”, “trick”, or “tactic”. In fact, it has nothing to do with how you physically play the guitar at all.

Instead, it’s a tip that will make you better from the insideout.

So what is it?

It’s the quote: “What you focus on is what you feel.”

Now, let me explain why this quote will make you a better player…

You see, not long ago, I got an email from a fellow Breakthrough Guitarist who asked, “how do you power through mistakes and not allow them to ruin your performance? That’s one thing that always makes me want to give up. I’ll make mistakes. Iron them out. Get it right.  And then the next day pick up the guitar and make the same mistakes. It can be like running in mud.”

Instantly, that Tony Robbins’ quote popped in my head.

Because being a great player is as much mental as it is physical.

When you focus on your mistakes, you’ll constantly feel bad. You may even feel like giving up… because remember, what you focus on is what you feel.

Instead, if you ignore the mistakes (wiping them away like rain drops on your windshield) and focus on your desired destination, as well as the good things…

You’ll find yourself getting better because you’re having FUN.

And when you have fun, you feel in a state of flow, and get “out of your own head” — which can be the cause of A LOT of mistakes.

If you’ve proven you can play something, then maybe the setback is mental, and not physical.

Fix that and you’ll be on your way!

After all, it’s just like what an early mentor of mine told me:

“Successful people focus on what they want, and what they want to have happen. Unsuccessful people focus on what they don’t want, and what they don’t want to have happen.”

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