Speed Doesn’t Make A Great Guitarist… This does

speed doesn’t make a great guitarist — THIS does 

Why do some people play a million notes, but you tune them out… While others play just a few, yet you can’t get enough?

It’s an interesting question. And it always makes me think of B.B. King. Because, while B.B. was definitely no “shredder”… and was nowhere near a “technical” player… he WAS one of the most influential players ever.

But why?

If it’s not technical ability and speed that makes a great guitar player, then what is it?

Well, I think B.B. and the other famous slow players were so influential because they mastered the language of music. Listening to a solo from these guys is like listening to an awe-inspiring speech…

Because it all comes down to how meaningful the musical conversation is.

Think about it this way; anyone can learn to speak english, and certain rappers can speak english REALLY fast. But that doesn’t mean they’re the greatest rappers. Because at the heart of the most famous rappers, were the messages they had in the lyrics. People would’ve resonated with them whether they rapped fast or slow.

Guitar is the same way. 

It’s a tool to express the language of music.

And when you have something meaningful to share, people listen — whether it’s fast or slow.

Which is why Eddie Van Halen can play fast and captivate audiences, and B.B. King can play slow and have the same impact.

So really, it’s not what you play… 

But what you say.

If you wanna have a more meaningful, musical conversation every time you pick up your guitar… you need to learn how to play by feel and not thinking.

As the legendary guitarist, Joe Pass, once said, “You can’t think and play”.

We’ve created an online lesson that we want to give you for free that will help you get to that point where you no longer think but play.

Join Today The Lead Guitar Lightbulb Moment

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